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Indiana fire chief investigated for actions at fatal ambulance crash. Cops say he had a 'meltdown'.

This story is a bit different and I’m not sure what to make of it. It involves an investigation that is underway in Clark County, Indiana. It focuses on Chief Greg Dietz of the Sellersburg Fire Department and his behavior at the scene of a fatal crash involving a department ambulance last Wednesday. Here are excerpts from an article by WHAS-TV:

The investigation involves his alleged actions at the scene of an accident in which one of his own employees – a Clark County Emergency Medical Technician – was killed.

While we don’t know much about the nature of the possible charges, we’ve been told it all centers on a terrible crash that happened Wednesday afternoon.

According to sources, Chief Dietz arrived on the scene and became angry over whether his agency or the Clark County Sheriff’s Office was in charge, especially concerning where to land the medical helicopter.

Clark County Sheriff Danny Rodden confirmed to WHAS the incident is under investigation.

Sellersburg Police Chief Russ Whelan says Dietz worked for 15 years as a volunteer auxiliary police officer.

He asked Dietz to step aside today.

From NewsandTribune.com:

David J. Gundle, a 50-year-old emergency medical technician from Memphis, was killed Wednesday when an ambulance driven by Erica R. Stoffregen, 26, of Henryville, left the roadway and struck a tree head on. They were responding to a nonemergency call of a welfare check. Clark County EMS is operated by the Sellersburg Volunteer Fire Department.

Gundle was first transported by ground ambulance to Henryville High School and then flown by Stat Flight to Scott County Hospital where he was pronounced dead. Officials said Dietz was upset because of where the helicopter had to land.

“I was told by numerous people that there was profanity used [by Dietz] on the fire radios,” Whelan said. “I understand that emotions were high at the time, but I believe we’re held to a higher standard.”

“He had a meltdown at the scene the other day,” Sheriff Danny Rodden said. “He just made some decisions and did some things he shouldn’t have.”

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