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Raw video of controlled burn: Evacuation ordered at Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina.

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NOTE: My apologies to all. This was not a lame attempt at an April Fools joke. I too noted some unusual things at this fire including the fire venting at three distinct locations on the roof and there was no news coverage. But I was also trying to figure out why the person with the camera was suddenly getting their gear. With no answers, I had not intended this to run until I figured it out. I didn’t realize I scheduled it and that it was up and running until I was at dinner with my family and saw the comments. This is, in fact, a controlled burn. Here are details from one of our readers:

This was a training burn on March 17, 2012 with firefighters from KDH, Lower Currituck, and Colington assisted by Dare County EMS.  The house was donated by the owner and had been used for non-live-fire training for several weeks before this.  It was on the sound front (Bay Drive in Kill Devil Hills) and was heavily damaged during Hurricane Irene.  This was approximately the sixth or seventh evolution of the day (give or take).  It was known that if the fire got into the attic, it would spread fast and crews would be pulled.  That’s what happened during this final evolution.  The 1-3/4-inch line wasn’t doing anything to darken the fire, so when it started venting heavily from the attic, the decision was made to pull interior crews, and the house was “let go.”  Kill Devil Hills is a combination department on the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina with three engines, one tower ladder, and a support/rehab unit.

EARLIER:

A house fire along North Carolina’s Outer Banks in Kill Devil Hills. No further information.

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Comments - Add Yours

  • Crowbar

    Looks like a drill.

  • In The Hood

    Obviously I wasn’t there but several observations: #1. Fire was coming out of the ventilations holes that it appears the FD cut based on the ladder placement and roofing material laying on the roof. That’s why we cut holes. #2. You can look right through the (open) windows and there doesn’t appear to be any smoke inside the house. #3. Seems like shoving a large attack line through the ceiling and letting it eat might have done a pretty decent job. #4. Were they just keeping the pump cool by flowing the deluge gun into the sky over the house and perhaps into the ocean?

  • Anonymous

    Training burn. 5th ignition.

  • Blue

    Was this a controlled burn?

    • dave statter

      I was wondering the same thing. The guy asking for the woman to hold the camera while he got his gear had me wondering. No news coverage.
      U

  • Old ways work

    Did they really evacuate because the vent holes did what they were supposed to do? Simply open up from below and this is over in a few minutes.

  • Marcus

    With what appears to be three vent holes, no sense of urgency, and the hose laid in the front lawn with care, this almost appears to be a training fire.

  • 625

    This was a training burn on March 17, 2012 with firefighters from KDH, Lower Currituck, and Colington assisted by Dare County EMS. The house was donated by the owner and had been used for non-live-fire training for several weeks before this. It was on the sound front (Bay Drive in Kill Devil Hills) and was heavily damaged during Hurricane Irene. This was approximately the sixth or seventh evolution of the day (give or take). It was known that if the fire got into the attic, it would spread fast and crews would be pulled. That’s what happened during this final evolution. The 1-3/4-inch line wasn’t doing anything to darken the fire, so when it started venting heavily from the attic, the decision was made to pull interior crews, and the house was “let go.” Kill Devil Hills is a combination department on the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina with three engines, one tower ladder, and a support/rehab unit. Hope this is helpful.

  • Legeros

    I am still searching for that secret stash of fire videos here in North Carolina. I know they must be out there. They just don’t seem surface on YouTube but once in a blue moon.

  • Anonymous

    If with this being a control burn there are alot of firefighters walking around wiht no gear on, you had firefighters inside with no RIT team seen anywhere. Need to learn that the sky dont need wetting did a good job of watering the smoke well into the sky.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for clearing this up 625. No better way to train than getting a real place to train on. Burn buildings are ok for the beginners and for some other classes but burning a real building provides the best experience…. Strike Da Box! K

  • Anonymous

    RIT was on the C side.