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Raw video: Multi-alarm house fire in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Plus a must see picture.

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Mike Nester’s video above, Dan Clerico of Lehigh Valley’s Bravest in the middle and Jayson Wagner’s video at the bottom from Sunday’s two-alarm plus fire in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Before we get to the details of the fire from Bill Rohrer at Newsworking I must point you to Mike Nester’s closing shot. It’s the elevated stream seen in the image below.

Newsworking:

At 10:30 AM Sunday morning, Allentown firefighters were dispatched to a reported house fire at 222 E. Susquehanna Street sending Engines 14, 11, 6, Truck 2 and BN 2 (Held).  Engine 14, located just a couple of blocks away went responding and reported heavy smoke from the 2-story S/F/D and called it a working fire.

Engine 13 was added as the designated F.A.S.T. company.  Battalion Chief Held special-called Engine 9 for manpower.

Crews attempted an interior attack, stretching multiple hand lines.  At one point, it looked like crews were getting a knock on the fire.  As they opened up walls and ceilings, they discovered more heavy fire. 

As the fire intensified, Battalion 2 struck the 2nd alarm, sending in Engines 10 and 2011 (Eastern Salisbury).  Engine 2011 relocated to the Fearless Fire Station. 

As the fire began to vent through the roof, firefighters were evacuated and they went to a defensive operation.  Engine 4 was special-called.
Master streams were put into service along with Squrt 6 and the ladder from Engine 11. 

The fire was brought under control in a couple of hours. 

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Comments - Add Yours

  • oldironsides

    Well….. that sure was interesting…. Hopefully just a bad day

  • Molly

    At first glance, I thought the picture was intended to show the firefighter on the playhouse thing, but then I saw the telesquirt(?)…. I hope the risks were worth it.

  • FOBS

    What the hell was that?

    Worst vent job ever, very poor use of a truck,I am shocked at the lack of skill seen in this video.

    Why were they evacuated from the structure?

    Co-ordinated truck work with the guys inside pulling ceilings should have made short work of this fire.

    And, no I wasn’t there and don’t know what challenges they faced, but the home owner certainly didn’t get their moneys worth from this cluster.

    Was this a total loss?

  • Oh Lord

    Lots of video time on water works 101.

    -Be safe out there.

  • Mr618

    As our former Secretary of Defense might have said, “sometimes you use the elevation device you have, not the elevation device you might want.”

    • dave statter

      Love it.

      Statter

  • FireGuy

    WOW !!
    Not sure what they were thinking

  • scba272

    The pic ( play house ff ) says it all, hope this is not a paid dept

  • medic44

    you have cut your hole, now get off the roof and bring your ladder with you.

  • Anonymous

    1 ladder in the rear, and it was a little giant on the deck

  • Mack Seagrave

    Disposable tools? … Roof ladder abandoned in fire venting from hole after it was cut. Pike pole left hanging, abandoned in front window. Was access to the fire that appeared to be in the attic obstructed by an old roof below a new one or a floor in the attic and little or no access point? Or was the attack stimied by lack of aqequate venting ahead of interior attack lines, under supplied attack lines, not enough folks opening walls and ceilings, not enough lines or a combination of some or all of the above? I would be interested in hearing from someone with first hand information.

  • CHAOS

    Really increases the chance of char-broiling your ladder when you cut the vent hole immediately upwind of your ladder. Impressive how the fire came out of the vent hole and the wind rolled it right across the ladder. Most of the northeast, budget-crushed FDs seem to not be throwing their equipment away like this.

  • Capt Snow

    Actually, I would have left the ladder too… As they pan out check out the huge nick on the fire side rail from the (or a) saw, that ladder wouldn’t pass a strength test! Let it melt, let insurance replace it :)

  • Tommy O

    Wasn’t it Billy Joel who sang..”and were living here in Allentown…where they are burning all their houses down”… no seriously I wasn’t there so I cant say what obstacles they had. Its hot today and a stubborn fire is no fun, especially on the days we are having.Stay safe.

  • 8truck

    I’ve seen Allentown work before and I must say that this is a rare occurence.

  • RETFF

    If you watch the Video and then look at the picture of the Telesqurt, it is clearly under the lines. I’m not trying to condone the rest of the actions at this incident, just pointing out that the Ariel device was not placed in danger.

  • BH

    If you don’t open the knee walls, eventually they will open themselves.

    • Tower5Ladder

      Agreed. The first thing I thought of was “bet it was running the knee walls”…..

  • formerff

    All these salty jakes know everything about roof ops, but missed the aerial work w/the squirt.
    Sometimes, in some areas, the power company arrives in time to isolate some power lines. I sure hope that is what hapened in Allentown.
    Billy Joel said;”…they’re closing all the factories down.”

  • atown ff

    here is your first hand account… the people inside were alerted by working smoke detectors. They first thought it was just their daughter cooking, then investigated. they had to wake everyone else, get out of the building and run to a neighbors house to call 911. when we got on scene, the fire had already run a hole in the kitchen ceiling and entered attic space, giving it full access to wood rafters that had been drying for 99 years. We could have went defensive immediately and not been wrong, however, 28 guys busted their ass on a 100 degree day for three hours. The family was able to recover lots of items that insurance can’t replace (pictures, records, etc), since we kept the body of fire out of living spaces. For those complaining about the scope being close to wires, the picture is misleading. First, you are looking at cable and phone lines (the power lines were 20 feet higher). Second, the scope was not close to the cable lines either!
    For you Monday morning QBS that can put out every fire….remember, not everyone is staffed to “out-resource” a fire. Initial attack crew was TWO guys. Next due engine was assigned rescue, because we couldn’t account for the tenants. If you can figure out a way to extinguish a fire that has already made it’s way into a roof and attic space with one crew of two guys and a hoseline, please let me know so we can train ourselves.

  • atown ff

    here is your first hand account… the people inside were alerted by working smoke detectors. They first thought it was just their daughter cooking, then investigated. they had to wake everyone else, get out of the building and run to a neighbors house to call 911. when we got on scene, the fire had already run a hole in the kitchen ceiling and entered attic space, giving it full access to wood rafters that had been drying for 99 years. We could have went defensive immediately and not been wrong, however, 28 guys busted their ass on a 100 degree day for three hours. The family was able to recover lots of items that insurance can’t replace (pictures, records, etc), since we kept the body of fire out of living spaces. For those complaining about the scope being close to wires, the picture is misleading. First, you are looking at cable and phone lines (the power lines were 20 feet higher). Second, the scope was not close to the cable lines either!
    For you Monday morning QBS that can put out every fire….remember, not everyone is staffed to “out-resource” a fire. Initial attack crew was TWO guys. Next due engine was assigned rescue, because we couldn’t account for the tenants. If you can figure out a way to extinguish a fire that has already made it’s way into a roof and attic space with one crew of two guys and a hoseline, please let me know so we can train ourselves.