FIRST ARRIVING NETWORK
First Arriving Network
Powered by the First Arriving Network, Reaching 1M+ First Responders Worldwide

Helmet-cam: East St. Louis, IL house fire.

Click here to follow STATter911.com on Facebook (hit “like”)

This is the latest video from East St. Louis, Illinois via bobbybushae on YouTube. You can always find these videos as soon as they are posted in the player on the right side of this page courtesy of our sponsor FireVideo.net, the makers of Fire Cam. Here’s the description:

This was a vacant house fire (no kidding). 1st due engine had a story and a half with the 2nd floor fully involved on arrival. Not a bit of smoke on the 1st floor since everything was vented. Quick knock down by the time 2nd due engine arrived. No injuries but a little trouble again with MSA PASS device malfunctions. Video filmed with 2 Fire Cam 1080′s from www.firevideo.net

Do you want to sell a rig? Click HERE to find out how with SellFireTrucks.com.

Comments - Add Yours

  • Crowbar

    Crew-cab seating positions are equipped with 3-point restraint systems. Does the driver’s seat not have one?

  • Cappy

    Another compromised potential firefighter killer structure left for the criminals to inhabit for years to come.Great quality video of the absence of 2 in and 2 out, no 360 or backup in place

    • Gil

      Not all fire departments do that 2 in and 2 out thing. And how do you know the officer or the driver didn’t go around back when the lineman went in? Put the fire out and the problem goes away.

      • Cappy

        Thanks Gil… How silly of me to suggest such a notion regarding the need for 2 in 2 out, 360 size up and additional backup lines.The limited video I watched was wrought with what amounts to several of the many benchmarks that accompany an incident that often is the subject of a line of duty death investigation and report issued to the fire service to outline the preventable deaths and injuries of firefighters. You don’t have to be a safety sally or anything of the sort to acknowledge a lack of a safe and intelligent fire ground in this video. It may have changed drastically after the video was over but generally speaking this scene was not an example of extending some rational aggression at an incident were there was a limited amount to gain. Severely understaffed fire grounds can lead to preventable injuries and deaths.
        2 in 2 out ….please look into it and ask yourself why so many are not “doing it”

  • Vet FF

    This looks like a training video (drill house) that was staged to promote the cameras. There were signs that this house was previously drilled on by firefighters. Waste of 9 minutes!

    • John

      Ever been in a vacant house before? Because this looks like a few of the vacant houses I have been in, where youth get inside and destroy things. Also these guys seen enough fire, I’m sure that they don’t have to do many training burns to keep up practice. And Lord knows that East St Louis isn’t hiring anybody new at this point as broke as that city is.

  • Anonymous

    Good work. No reason not to make an attempt to put it out from upstairs, as they did.

  • Knuckles

    Turning fire and black smoke into nothing but white smoke before the second due arrives. Good work. The holes in the walls are from someone looking for copper pipe. Those who can, do. Those who can’t, nit pick real firemen on the internet.

    • FF from CT

      Agreed

      Seems there are a bunch of perfect firefighters on here that love to nit pick and have an answer for it all. Would love to see some of their videos.

  • NJFF1984

    “Those who can, do. Those who can’t, nit pick real firemen on the internet” Awesome quote knuckles! hahaha

  • Anonymous

    @ vet FF

    Clearly you don’t run in an area that has many vacant houses or vagrants. This is a very typical vacant house that has been picked clean of copper and aluminum. The holes in the walls and ceilings are from scrappers stealing the piping and duct work!

  • Anonymous

    I could not have said it better Knuckles!!

  • FlFireMedic

    My big concern, risk versus gain. It’s a vacant structure. Why are we risking potential life threatening injuries. Someone even made the comment about “holes in the floor”. Throw a ladder, hit it from outside. Or stay on the stairs and easily punch through that wall to hit it. And 2in/2out was developed for a reason. I want to get wet and fight the “demon” too, but I even more want to go home without a trip to the ED or worse not go home at all. Light duty sucks.